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Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
city, alabama, gabe guttierez, a tough few days. another emotional day ahead, i suspect. >> reporter: that's right. this afternoon mourners are preparing to remember that slain bus driver. police appear willing to wait this one out. as police towed the school bus from the crime scene friday, investigators released the first picture of the man they say is responsible. 65-year-old jimmy lee dykes. the man believed to be holding hostage a boy with asberger's syndrome named ethan in an underground bunker. >> we understand he's got supplies there. he's got food there. but this is a young child five years old. has he got food that this child will eat? >> reporter: nbc news has confirmed dykes served in the u.s. navy in the 60s. he served various awards, a good conduct med methal and vietnam service medal. but on tuesday those honors seem very far away. police say dykes boarded a stopped school bus and demanded two random young children. when the bus drive refused, plea say dykes shot and killed him and made off with 5-year-old ethan. kelly miller says her kids got off that bus right before
all of new york state through vermont and new hampshire. some of our big cities, new york city's the trickiest forecast along with long island and coastal connecticut. we're going to go from snow tomorrow morning to a period of rain and heavy rain friday. and then over to a period of heavy snow as the storm leaves late friday night. that's why the storm totals are lower there. but hartford's going to be in the bull's-eye. again, boston, 18 to 24 inches possible. so that would probably cripple boston. travel would be difficult probably till maybe saturday night or maybe sunday morning. make your plan as cordingly. i know airlines are already starting to cancel flights and letting you change stuff for free. go ahead and do that now while you can. more updates throughout the morning here on "morning joe." we're brewed by starbucks. how do you keep an older car running like new? you ask a ford customer. when they tell you that you need your oil changed you got to bring it in. if your tires need to be rotated, you have to get that done as well. jackie, tell me why somebody should br
this weekend. we're looking good as far as snow is concerned. look at new york city. two days in the mid to upper 40s. no complaints. the snow almost completely gone from that big snowstorm last weekend. we get colder this weekend, but it's short-lived. here's your valentine's day forecast. what a beautiful day from the southeast through texas all the way through the whole southern half of the country. and then the northern plains, we showed you some of those snow showers possibly around chicago, too. overall looks like a nice day for anyone traveling on the eastern seaboard. washington, d.c., near 50 degrees today. not so bad, mid-february. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ dad ] find it? ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it again -- watch me. just like that one... [ male announcer ] the durability of the volkswagen passat. pass down something he will be grateful for. good arm. that's the power of german engineeri
atlanta and you will get rain in your morning rush hour and mobile and pensacola and panama city. the only snowy weather is to the north behind the storm, breaking out from green bay, oshkosh to chicago. and behind that, it is extremely cold this morning from minneapolis through north dakota. that's a minus 45 windchill in north dakota this morning. that is not fun by any's standards. the next significant storm will arrive on the west coast, as we arrive throughout the day today and move to the middle of the country, especially wednesday night and thursday, potential m major winter storm in kansas and illinois and missouri and iowa. we leave you with a nice sunrise shot there, beautiful red hues. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. mine was earned in djibouti, africa, 2004. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal.
england. bring the umbrella with you this morning in new york city, philadelphia, down to the d.c., baltimore areas. starting off your morning commute dry. we've got rain and snow heading our way late today. currently that storm is located over tennessee bringing some rain and snow mixture right along the ohio river. even louisville could pick up a half inch of snow. there's the forecast for today. it's actually going to be mild during the day. but then it will get cloudy. the rain will come. it will get a little colder, changing over to snow in philadelphia and new york especially after dark. most of us will get home okay. the roads won't be slippery. later on tonight they will get slippery. just enough to be on the annoying side. about one to three inches predicted for new york city to philadelphia. there's a little sliver central jersey towards the coast and long island that could pick up three to four. boston and hartford not looking at much for you at all. the rest of the country today, we're leaving the southeast with a little bit of chance for rain today. especially north
. when you have the most important political city in the country, washington d. c., and the post has been the dominant voice in that city for a long time, members of congress, federal policymakers, whether they want to or not, that is their principal link with print journalism. sure, you get the "times" or the "wall street journal" or the "l. a. times" -- the people, they meet and talk with by that morning, there is the general presumption everybody has read the post. >> everybody has read the post, do they still say that? >> i do not know. probably not. they may very well have glanced at the website, had and look -- had a look at an aggregator. >> how long did you work for the post? >> from 1979 until 1981. >> why did you leave? >> how i went there is kind of fascinating. i had written a couple of op-ed pieces. i had not been in journalism. i was in politics. they approached me and said, would you like to write political editorials for "the washington post?" not knowing any better, i said yes. she said, write a once a week column. so i did that through the campaign of 1980, covering the
is with us. is the city going to be ready for the rush hour tomorrow? >> reporter: they may be ready, but they're telling people to pack your patience along with the briefcases. what a beautiful start to the afternoon on sunday at the downtown garden in boston. kids are out with mom and dad enjoying all this snow. they'll be talking about this snow for quite some time because logan recorded 24.9 inches. that's fifth all time highest storm total at that airport. this is a significant storm event. tomorrow the nbta says that all the bus service, train service, commuter rail service will operate on a normal schedule, but people should know the times will not necessarily be what they're used to. so come extra early if your boss is a stickler about you showing up for work on time. you might want to show up at your local train stop a little earlier tomorrow. limited service is going to get under way about 2:00 today, alex. for a lot of folks who depend on public transit, this is a good thing for them because they can get out and about over the next couple three hours while we still have da
way tonight in new orleans. alex is joining us next from new york city. caller: my comment is -- i am not particularly a sports fan. it seems very repetitive back and forth. as far as the regulation -- my observation, not just about football but hockey and also even baseball -- people seem to like people getting hit and getting beat up. they even like people looking kind of distorted like when they take drugs. i would be in favor if there could be a lot to prevent head injuries or young people being persuaded to do drugs to get onto teams or whatever. it is my commentary to my fellow americans the sunday morning that, it is like gladiatorial combat. . "the hunter games." it is almost like a freak show you enjoy watching human suffering. that is my cheery comment. host: thank you for the call. on the twitter page, there is this. back in 2009, tiki barber testified on the issue of head injuries at the high school and professional lover -- level. [video clip] >> you hear the file but comes from people who think the nfl is not addressing this issue. at the end of the day, it is a player p
i'm driving back, and it's light at almost 6:00. it's light. look how beautiful new york city is. don't come to me, t.j. t.j. is obviously back, right? >> he must think you're beautiful too. >> i'm wearing a different sweater today. >> but the collar of the sweater looks like a mouse ate it. >> look how beautiful new york city is. where are we? we're in midtown looking north. >> yep, that's northwest. george washington bridge upper left. upper west side on the left part of the screen. that's the reservoir. >> the jacqueline kennedy r reservoir. >> yes, it is. i think they went with onassis. >> sill me me. do you know for the kid at home watching this on the history channel, she was, what, like 31, 32 when she became first lady? >> that's amazing. >> i think it was 31. >> i was 31 when i started "morning joe." >> no. >> you guys know that? >> no, actually. no, you weren't. in fact, you have a birthday coming up. >> no, i don't. i have no birthday coming up. >> yes, he does. all right. time to take a look at the morning papers. "the los angeles times," music fans are in mourning to
against gun control. gun safety. and questions were raised at the time of the oklahoma city bombing. he had a lot of ties to militia movements. he received a coded message presumably alerting his office or whoever whoever the fax was addressed to, that something was coming. there was an investigation about did he turn over that message quickly enough to the authorities. he eventually was cleared but there was a cloud of suspicion. there were articles and articles written about it. this is a guy whose ideologiology guns and militia fits squarely in the ted nugent view. in this cases, it is not surprising at all that he would bring them. >> bill: we'll continue to take your comments at bpshow and by phone at 1-866-55-press. unless john boehner steps up and says wait a minute, we do have certain standards here, ted nugent will be in the gallery tonight at the state of the union. i dare him. you know also -- you know what already pisses me off is the cameras will be focused on him and when president obama is talking about gun control, it will be a split screen. president obama and ted nugen
you ask how to get to somewhere at a certain hour, it's going to be bad. how do you get to culver city from here? >> i think we laughed for five solid minutes. >> welcome to my world. >> you're screwed. >> stephanie: okay. >> or you could take the 101 to the 405 but going through -- >> stephanie: simple math is never right. okay. 1-800-steph-12. >> usually it is faster because at one time it took me two hours to get to santa monica. >> stephanie: i'm ready for my close-up. however, i think there is no way to get to culver city from here. >> no. the worst place you could go from here, seriously. >> stephanie: the rest of the show, people asking how do you get from burbank to culver city at 9:00 a.m. >> have you ever seen that sketch? the californians. >> stephanie: are you kidding? that's any party in l.a. oh, my gosh. traffic. which way did you go? that way? oh. >> stephanie: first hour of a party then everybody has to go because they talk about what's the best way to get home. all right. 1-800-steph-12 the phone number. jill in ithaca. you're on "the stephanie miller show." >> caller:
of this country right now. the deficit is hurting our counties, cities, and our villages. for the first time, maybe not in this country but in his presidency, we have big cities that are going bankrupt. so what i heard about the president's speech tonight was a lot of spending. spending, spending, spending and not enough to help people. i think medicare and social security is not the fault of the poverty people of this country. i think it is the fault of society as a whole. by the way, government is for the people and by the people and this is not barack obama's government. it is the american people's government. thank you. >> let's take a look at the president's comments on gun violence from the state of the union earlier tonight. >> it has been two months since newtown. i know this is not the first time that this country has debated on how to reduce gun violence. but this time it is different. overwhelming majority of americans, american who is believe in the second amendment, have come together around common sense reform. like background checks that will make it harder for criminals to ge
firearms, to hold firearms in every household. the crime rate in that city is half. >> sean: are you pro-choice? >> yes. >> sean: i'm pro-choice. you don't have to have a gun. leave my guns alone. >> liberals are not trying to take your guns away because you are a legal gun owner. >> i can only have seven bullets. i want more than seven bullets. thank you very much. i didn't say a hundred. why are you only giving me seven. what if there are three intruders? >> people that are mowing down 20 children at one tiem you are a legal gun owner. i'm talking about the people that need to go through those background checks and republicans are against that. >> sean: no, i'm not. i tell everybody who gets a gun, go get trained. >> and get a background check. >> sean: good to see you both. still ahead, colonel oliver north, with word iran and syria, they may consider closing our ally in the middle east. first you need to pinch yourself after seeing the media mash, left wing journalists people that voted for al gore because he sold his tv network to a big oil country. it might hurt his growing career.
and cities and i don't remember wisconsin but i know for single women it's anywhere from 19,000 to 29,000 that's just minimal, all of those things that are absolutely necessary. so i think everyone says -- i work with a lot of organizations and everyone will say well, that we need one-on-one especially for like the latino groups and we need one-on-one for everyone really. that is what everybody wants and you sort of know that from your research as well. i think what is really important is senior centers and places where people can actually come for help. finra has this great project on libraries and there are that many of them. i think there are 25 they funded. i've been to a number of them doing programs with them. they are incredible. so there ways that we could do this but there is no coordination, no reach nationally except through these little programs that the national council on aging does a great initiative as well. so i don't know what will happen after this administration. >> thank you. >> senator franken. >> thank you. this topic brings up so many -- so many subjects about
measures that we still do have people crossing in the 1900 mile border. there is no city in the country that is perfectly safe. there is a real penchant on how you're just spending money for very diminishing returns. >> the obama administration has done more than any other prior administration. our border today, we are spending over $18 billion just last year alone in the interior and in the border. that is more than all federal, criminal law enforcement agencies combined. more than the fbi, the dea, aft, secret service of course i mean, you name it. that is pretty incredible. and we are currently at net zero unlawful migration from mexico. here is the piece left undone, actually, there has been no path to citizenship. there is no road map, there are no legal mechanisms from people who are either currently in the united states to become citizens, the fact that they may have been here five, ten, 15, 20 years. or for family members to come to the u.s. through lawful means without waiting a decade or two decades. >> jessica, on that point, your organization is very dedicated to staunching
is the person who talked about federal agents after oklahoma city. so this is a man who's been allowed to have a platform on the national stage, even though he is a wing nut. and, finally, you have someone reich chris wallace who is certainly a more moderate voice of fox telling the truth and calling him out as ridiculous. and wayne lapierre is not prepared for this at all. >> guys, why don't they pay attention to the aclu? if you think about it, you can't do a stop and frisk law without fighting the aclu. you can't just go out and frisk them. these guys think somebody is coming to their house to take away their shotgun? there's no precedent for this. we are so scared to invade people's privacy in this country that the only time you get checked -- you don't get checked getting on a train. the only time is getting on an airplane. >> chris, you like american history. you reach hitch ard hoffstetter. from the very beginning, this country was born with this conflict between people who were fearful of big government and those who weren't. and people like wayne lapierre and others just found these f
-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools, the city university of new york, and ibm, students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. [applause] four years ago, we started race to the top -- a competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards, for about 1 percent of what we spend on education each year. tonight, i'm announcing a new challenge to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers, and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math -- the skills today's employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future. now, even with better high schools, most young people will need some higher education. it's a simple fact -- the more education you have, the more likely you are to have a job and work your way into the middle class. but t
to many cities around the country, and people are talking about how they actually feel like this film sees who i am. because it's heavily stigmatized. it's not a very treatable disease. and it's a condition that sort of, if we liken it to cancer, it's diagnosed at stage 4. well, that's way too late. so hopefully a movie like this will help it become, you know -- in the onset. >> let's go back and look at some pictures from this great movie. it is my favorite this year. bradley cooper's going to joins again. he's going to stay around for the second segment. we never do this. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> we're b
, is that you know, i've gone around to many cities around the country, and people are talking about how they actually feel like this film sees who i am. because it's heavily stigmatized. it's not a very treatable disease. and it's a condition that sort of, if we liken it to cancer, it's diagnosed at stage 4. well, that's way too late. so hopefully a movie like this will help it become, you know -- in the onset. >> let's go back and look at some pictures from this great movie. it is my favorite this year. bradley cooper's going to joins again. he's going to stay around for the second segment. we never do this. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic
of the inner cities, the towns. i live in a well-known mennonite area, and they are coming up here. why? pennsylvania welcomes them with open arms, will not turn them in to immigration, and i will tell you one thing -- it will lead to either a race war or a revolution. host: mark, we got your point. let's get your response from deepak bhargava. guest: that call illustrates that there are deep anxieties about immigration and the changing face of america. in a few short years this will be a color nation. part of the republican stance is shaped by the election results were an overwhelming number of latinos voted for the president. there clearly is no path for a political party that is not willing to speak to the needs and concerns of the entire population. the anxiety that you see, we see younger americans much more supportive of a path to citizenship, older americans less willing to see that happen -- this is part and parcel of the change we are going through as a country. the president's point, that we cannot think of this as them against us is critical. we are all american, this is part
and still good people. find out how to test your own blind spots next. [ male announcer ] citi turns 200 this year. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ and the next great idea could be yours. why take exercise so seriously,when it can be fun? push-ups or sprints? what's wrong with fetch? or chase? let's do this larry! ooh, i got it, i got it! (narrator) the calorie-smart nutrition in beneful healthy weight... includes grains and real chicken, because a healthy dog is a playful dog. beneful healthy weight. find us on facebook to help put more play in your day. she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a week straight. so i use tide to get out those week old stains and downy to get it fresh and soft. since i'm the
of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. >>> we're back. today's president's day, a holiday for most americans. a day we honor our presidents and shop for mattresses for some reason, and lots of books, of course, have been written about the exclusive club now. the exclusive club among presidents, relationships forged through the powerful singular experience of being elected occasionally are rivals. amateur psychologists might have a field day teasing out whether "w" was trying to compete with dad in his unfinished business by invading iraq and going after saddam. and the so-called black president, he was called that, bill clinton, was accused by some of racism for comments he made while barack obama was beating hillary clinton to the democratic nomination in 2008. by the way, all of these presidents and jimmy carter will gather in two months at the dedication of george w. bush's library at southern methodist. that's down in dallas. >> anyway, david author of "barack obama the story", a great book. james moore, he is our other guest, has covered the bushes for decades. he is the co-au
schools and city university of new york and ibm, students will graduate with a high school diploma and associate's degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. and four years ago -- [applause] four years ago we started race to the top, a competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter cure lick lump and higher standards, all about 1% of what we spend on education this year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge, to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy and we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools most young people will need some higher education. it is a simple fact. the more education you've got, the more likely you are to have a good job and work your way into the middle class. but
to school. that did not happen in new york city. that is a different culture. that is what bill clinton was warning barack obama about. be careful because these people really care about their culture and their life and what they do. they care about different things than you do. part of it is cultural. when you ask somebody, or one of your leaders, you ask about the nra, we are viewed as an advocacy organization that stands up for gun owners and the second amendment. that is about 12%. the rest goes to competition, a gun safety, technical information, and a lot of our research goes into boy scouts, girl scout, bringing people into the shooting sport and teaching them to handle guns safely. there are fewer gun accidents today than there were at the beginning of the 20th century but there are a lot more guns. the only people out there teaching gun safety and training people is the national rifle association. i have got to go. [laughter] i have to go but i will take you to a gun show. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite co
permission to the other side of the city. [laughter] second, i started to pay special attention to the plaques on the buildings that recommend -- that recognize the united states of america for lending a hand in rebuilding. i was proud. the marshall plan, imf, and other organizations led by the united states are evidence of our ability to make the right decisions at the right time, taking risks today in the interest of tomorrow. we now face a similar crossroads. we can be complacent or competitive as markets bloom in every corner of the world. with or without us. we could be there to help plant the seeds or we can see the power to others. given the chance to lead a second great american century, we must not just look to the american landscape today. look at the days to come. we must marshal the courage that define the the marshall plan so that we might secure in the future freedom. let's remember the principles of jefferson's time. looking to independence echoing in our time. america's national interest is in leading strongly and it still in doers in this world. let me leave you
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)